Hawaii Teacher on Board
Safety Measures

By Larry Gaddis

Oct. 10, 1998. The sinking of the Titanic is but one example of the many disasters where people have lost their lives at sea. Survival is the ultimate goal of shipboard emergency procedures. The ocean is vast and ships are often alone when problems occur. Specialized emergency equipment and regular training ensure that the people preserve an acceptable margin of safety during accidents. Even in the unlikely event that the ship goes down, with proper preparation, everyone on board will be rescued.

Bob Golden models the latest in survival suit fashon.
Bob Golden models the latest in survival suit fashion.

When our party first boarded, we were instructed in the emergency procedures for evacuating the ship. These included instruction and practice in donning our bright orange survival suits as well as deploying and boarding our inflatable life boats.

Captain Gomes explains the transponder.
Captain Gomes explains the transponder.

When our party first boarded, we were instructed in the emergency procedures for evacuating the ship. These included instruction and practice in donning our bright orange survival suits as well as deploying and boarding our inflatable life boats.

Life ring with with smoke signal and strobe light.
Life ring with with smoke signal and strobe light.

If someone should fall off the ship, a crew member would immediately throw them a lifesaving ring which emits a smoke signal and strobe light upon hitting the water. At the man overboard signal, the captain can deploy a fast powerboat in less than a minute to quickly retrieve the person before he or she is lost amid the swells.

These precautions provide our party with some measure of comfort about our safety, and serve to remind us that the open ocean is no place to be careless.